The Latest: The latest developments in the US elections




WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on Election Day 2016 (all times EST):

8:27 p.m.

Donald Trump has won Alabama and its nine electoral votes after Sen. Jeff Sessions endorsed the billionaire candidate.

That brings Trump's total in the Electoral College to 60 votes, to Clinton's 44 votes.

It takes 270 votes to win the presidency.

The results continue the state's streak of voting for Republicans every presidential election since 1980.

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8:25 p.m.

A mariachi band has serenaded Donald Trump on the sidewalk outside Trump Tower in New York City.

The group of men in big white sombreros paraded down the sidewalk Tuesday across the street from the skyscraper playing horns and guitars.

The vibrant performance interrupted a mostly low-energy night outside Trump headquarters.

A separate group of about five Trump backers marched along the sidewalk across from the midtown Manhattan hotel where Trump is expected to address supporters later Tuesday night. They chanted, "Lock her up!" as they marched behind police barricades.

A group of enterprising vendors also patrolled the outside of the hotel, selling Trump buttons, shirts and hats.

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8:25 p.m.

Texas authorities say they arrested a man who claimed to be working for Donald Trump for voter fraud.

Phillip Cook, Jr. was arrested after trying to vote for a second time at a polling station in an unincorporated area outside of Houston on Tuesday. Fort Bend County Sheriff Troy Nehls says Cook told poll officials and sheriff's deputies that he was helping the Trump campaign and testing election security.

Nehls said Cook was booked on suspicion of a felony charge.

Trump has alleged widespread voter fraud and that there are insufficient safeguards to protect the integrity of the election.

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8:13 p.m.

Donald Trump has won Tennessee and its 11 electoral votes.

Tuesday's vote is the fifth presidential contest in a row in which the state voted for the Republican candidate. That includes the 2000 election, when native son Al Gore lost the state to Republican George W. Bush.

It takes 270 votes to win the presidency.

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8:10 p.m.

An election watchdog says some voters were denied provisional ballots at several polling stations in Atlanta.

Georgia Election Protection coalition spokesman Harold Franklin says poll mangers refused to provide provisional ballots to voters Tuesday. He says the group received reports that voters were given no reason for being refused.

Franklin claims voters who are eligible or entitled to a provisional ballot were denied. He did not know the number of voters who were refused, but said the bulk occurred in Fulton County.

Franklin says he spoke with Fulton County election officials, who he said told polling managers to provide voters with ballots. The Fulton County elections office did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Election Protection is organized by the Lawyers Committee for Civils Rights Under Law.

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8:09 p.m.

Donald Trump has won South Carolina.

The Republican nominee was awarded the state's nine electoral votes, giving him 40 for the night. The result was expected as the state has long been a Republican stronghold.

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8:08 p.m.

Democratic Rep. John Carney has won the Delaware governor's race eight years after losing his first bid to become the state's chief executive.

Carney easily defeated Republican state Sen. Colin Bonini of Dover in Tuesday's gubernatorial contest. The victory was driven by voter registration numbers that heavily favor Democrats.

Carney has said job creation and economic development will be among his top priorities, along with improving Delaware's public education system.

He also has acknowledged that the next governor faces significant challenges given troubling revenue expectations and escalating costs for Medicaid and state employee health care.

Carney will succeed Jack Markell, who defeated Carney in the 2008 Democratic gubernatorial primary.

Carney previously served as lieutenant governor.

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8:05 p.m.

Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan has written in his father, former Rep. Lawrence Hogan, as his choice to be president.

Doug Mayer, Hogan's spokesman, said Tuesday the Republican governor voted early.

Hogan has been saying for months that he wasn't going to support Republican Donald Trump. He has said he has been extremely disappointed in the candidates from both major parties.

Mayer says the governor decided to write in the name of the person who taught him what it meant to hold public office with integrity.

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8 p.m.

Democrat Hillary Clinton has won Massachusetts, Maryland, New Jersey, Delaware and the District of Columbia while Republican Donald Trump has captured Oklahoma.

Clinton was awarded Massachusetts' 11 electoral votes, 10 from Maryland, 14 from New Jersey and three each from Delaware and the nation's capital, giving her 44 for the night. Trump picked up seven from Oklahoma, giving him 31.

The results Tuesday were not surprising. Massachusetts and the District of Columbia are two of the nation's safest Democratic strongholds.

The last time Oklahoma went for a Democrat was 1964, when it voted for Lyndon Johnson. Maryland last went for the GOP in 1988.

New Jersey has been a safe Democratic state for 20 years. Its governor, Chris Christie, is a close Trump ally but is saddled with low approval numbers.

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7:45 p.m.

A state official says Democrats have gone to court to extend voting across Colorado by two hours after the secretary of state's voter registration system went down for nearly 30 minutes Tuesday.

Lynn Bartels, a spokeswoman for the secretary of state's office, says the hearing was scheduled for federal court in Denver.

She says state officials are investigating what caused the outage, which forced in-person voters to cast provisional ballots. Some county clerks were unable to process mail ballots that needed to have the signature verified.

Tauna Lockhart, spokeswoman for the state information technology office, says the system came back up about 3:20 p.m. She says the incident is under investigation by state officials, but there is no evidence the network was hit by hackers.

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7:35 p.m.

The North Carolina Board of Elections has agreed to extend voting in eight precincts in Durham County, where Democrats have a 4-to-1 registration advantage over Republicans.

The state board voted 3-2 Tuesday night to extend voting by an hour in two precincts most affected by a computer glitch. The problem forced poll workers to check for registered voters on paper printouts, causing long lines at some locations.

The board says six more precincts can stay open for a shorter time.

The NAACP's North Carolina chapter had asked for the eight precincts to stay open for 90 extra minutes. Hillary Clinton's campaign also supported keeping the polls open later in Durham.

Two groups filed lawsuits seeking to keep the polls open, but a state superior court judge declined to intervene.

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7:32 p.m.

North Carolina got more attention than usual this election, and exit polls show why.

Exit polls conducted by Edison Research for national media outlets suggest a tight finish between Democrat Hillary Clinton and Republican Donald Trump for the state's 15 electoral votes.

The polls suggest a majority of men back Trump, while Clinton won a majority among women — with the margins essentially even. The polls suggest women made up slightly more of the electorate.

About four out of five nonwhite voters backed Clinton, while about six out of 10 white voters supported Trump. But the exit polls don't offer definitive information about actual turnout among those groups, with the estimates again pointing to a close finish.

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7:30 p.m.

Republican Donald Trump has won West Virginia and its five electoral votes.

The Mountain State was one of the billionaire's biggest supporters in the Republican primary. He is popular for promising to bring back coal jobs. Hillary Clinton had largely been largely shunned for making comments perceived as an affront to the industry.

The dynamic has resulted in one of the few states where Republicans didn't shy from the brash businessman and instead looked to ride his coattails. Many Democrats for congressional and other races scrambled to distance themselves from Clinton and refused to endorse her.

West Virginia has voted for Republican presidential candidates in each of the last four presidential races.

It takes 270 electoral votes to win the presidency.

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7:15 p.m.

Philadelphia District Attorney Seth Williams says he has found no evidence of fraud or intimidation at the city's polls despite Republican candidate Donald Trump's warnings about voter fraud.

Williams says no major problems have emerged among the 68 complaints his office investigated during the first half of Election Day.

Meantime, several Pennsylvania counties are reporting a handful of complaints about touchscreen machines switching votes. They say the machines are quickly being re-calibrated to fix the problem.

Pennsylvania Secretary of State Pedro Cortes says the GOP reported problems with about 25 machines, out of nearly 24,000 deployed statewide. He says in all cases votes ended up being recorded correctly.

State GOP Chairman Rob Gleason says he doesn't see anything "nefarious" in the apparent vote switching on older machines.

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7:10 p.m.

Vast divides of race, gender and education are keeping the presidential race in two tightly fought southern states close shortly after polls close.

In both Virginia and Georgia, about 9 in 10 black voters and two-thirds of Hispanics backed Clinton, while most whites backed Trump.

That's according to exit polls conducted by Edison Research for national media outlets.

In Georgia, large majorities of whites with and without college degrees backed Trump. In Virginia those two groups diverged. Whites without a college degree backed Trump by a large margin, while those with a degree split their votes between the two major-party candidates.

Women in both states were far more likely than men to back Clinton. Majorities of women in both states said Trump's treatment of women bothers them a lot.

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7 p.m.

Republican Donald Trump has won Kentucky and Indiana while Democrat Hillary Clinton has won Vermont.

Trump was awarded Kentucky's eight electoral votes and Indiana's 11. Vermont gives Clinton three. These are the first states to be decided Tuesday in the 2016 general election.

The wins were expected.

Vermont has voted for a Democrat every election since 1988, while Kentucky has gone Republican every cycle since 2000.

Indiana is normally a Republican stronghold but went for President Barack Obama in 2008. The Republicans captured it again in 2012 and Trump's running mate, Mike Pence, is the state's governor.

The winning candidate needs 270 electoral votes.

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6:45 p.m.

Americans who have voted already in the presidential election appear to be evenly divided on the benefits of international trade.

According to an exit poll conducted by Edison Research for national media outlets, about four out of 10 voters believe trade among nations creates jobs. Another four out of 10 say it takes jobs from Americans.

Republican nominee Donald Trump has railed against decades of U.S. trade policy and has energized working-class voters with his promises to create more jobs at home. Democrat Hillary Clinton has historically supported U.S. trade deals, including as secretary of state.

But she has backed off her support for the Trans-Pacific Partnership. President Barack Obama's trade agreement with Pacific Rim nations is still pending.
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