The Latest: The latest developments in the US elections




WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on Election Day 2016 (all times EST):

8:10 a.m.

Donald Trump says the presidential campaign has been an "amazing process" that put him in touch with the unfulfilled aspirations of the American people.

Interviewed by phone Tuesday on "Fox and Friends," the Republican presidential nominee said he's seen "so many hopes and dreams that didn't happen, that could have been helped with proper leadership."

Trump says he "took a little heat" for bringing up "illegal immigration" from the day he launched his campaign, but "in the end it was the right thing to do."

Trump said his campaign is a "movement" and the American people are "incredible."

Asked if he had any regrets, Trump said "sure, there's things I would have done different." He didn't name any.

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8 p.m.

Eric Trump says that his father will concede the election if he loses and the results are "legit and fair."

In an Election Day interview with MSNBC's Morning Joe, Donald Trump's son said that "all we want is a fair fight, not just for this election but for all elections."

The Republican presidential nominee has repeatedly warned of a "rigged election," though there is no evidence of widespread fraud in the electoral system.

Eric Trump said, "we've seen states where a few thousand votes can make a difference."

Pressed by MSNBC anchors, he said of his father, "if he loses and it's legit and fair, and there's not obvious stuff out there then without question, yes," he would concede.

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7:45 a.m.

Republican Donald Trump is expressing confidence on Election Day.

In a phone interview Tuesday morning on "Fox and Friends," the Republican presidential nominee said: "We're going to win a lot of states." But in a rare moment of uncertainty, he added: "Who knows what happens ultimately?"

If rival Hillary Clinton wins, Trump says he won't be looking back positively on a failed bid for the White House. He said: "If I don't win, I will consider it a tremendous waste of time, energy and money."

Trump said he's spent over $100 million of his own money on his campaign. Federal Election Commission reports, however, show he's more than $30 million short of that claim. According to fundraising records, Trump's investment so far is about $66 million

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7:30 a.m.

Democratic vice presidential nominee Tim Kaine says he and Hillary Clinton can clinch the White House if they win any one of the "checkmate" states.

In an interview with ABC's Good Morning America Tuesday, Kaine said the battleground states of North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Florida and Ohio each hold the key to a win for the Democratic running mates.

He said that Tuesday's election is a "history-making race" but he also warned against complacency, saying that "democracy always works better when people participate."

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6:15 a.m.

Tim Kaine has cast his ballot for president in his hometown of Richmond, Virginia.

The Democratic vice presidential nominee and his wife, Anne Holton, voted shortly after polls opened at 6 a.m. at a retirement community near their home.

Kaine was cheered by supporters waiting in line.

After voting, he spoke to reporters where he encouraged Americans to vote and said that if elected, he and running mate Hillary Clinton would try and bring the country together.

"The sign of a vigorous democracy is one where a lot of people participate," Kaine said.

1:40 a.m.

Donald Trump has a final message to his supporters in the election's waning hours: "We have to win."

The GOP nominee tells his final rally crowd in Grand Rapids, Michigan that: "If we don't win, this will be the single greatest waste of time, energy and money in my life."

Trump's final event at a local convention center was surprisingly staid, with none of the theatrics of an earlier rally in a packed arena in New Hampshire.

As he spoke, dozens of people streamed toward the exit, forming a procession in front of an area where reporters were stationed.

Some said they were trying to get closer to the door. But most said they were leaving because they were tired, wanted to beat traffic or had heard enough.

Trump says now that he's finished his campaign, his "new adventure" will be "making America great again."

1:03 a.m.

Hillary Clinton is calling on voters to reject Donald Trump's "dark and divisive" vision. She says there's no reason why "America's best days are not ahead of us."

She's closing out her campaign with a rally early Tuesday in Raleigh, North Carolina, featuring Lady Gaga and Jon Bon Jovi. Clinton told cheering supporters that their "work will be just beginning" after Election Day.

Clinton spent the final hours of her presidential campaign offering a more positive vision for the country, trying to strike a stark contrast with Trump.

She was joined in her final events by her husband, former president Bill Clinton, and confidants, including embattled aide Huma Abedin.

Clinton plans to end her campaign by greeting supporters at the Westchester airport, in New York, where she was expected to land after 3 a.m. EST.

1:02 a.m.

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton was serenaded by Lady Gaga and Jon Bon Jovi at her campaign finale in Raleigh, North Carolina, early Tuesday.

The entertainers appeared shortly before Clinton concluded her brief post-midnight visit and before boarding her campaign plane for Westchester, New York, where supporters were waiting to cheer her after a marathon day of campaigning. She was joined in her final events by her husband, former president Bill Clinton, daughter Chelsea, and closest confidants, including embattled aide Huma Abedin.

12:54 a.m.

Donald Trump is channeling Hollywood as he kicks off the final rally of his unconventional presidential campaign.

"Today is our Independence Day," Trump declares at a rally in Grand, Rapids Michigan in the early hours Tuesday. He says, "Today the American working class is going to strike back."

Trump had been expected to hold his last rally in New Hampshire - but added one last event to his calendar as his team made an 11th-hour push into traditionally Democratic states.

Trump says he doesn't need superstars like Jay Z, Beyonce or Lady Gaga to draw crowds like his rival Hillary Clinton. He says, "All we need is great ideas to make America great again."

12:10 a.m.

Donald Trump got off to a quick, early lead in the 2016 presidential election, winning over the voters of three New Hampshire precincts by a 32-25 margin over Hillary Clinton.

Polls in the tiny New Hampshire towns of Dixville, Hart's Location and Millsfield opened just after midnight Tuesday and closed as soon as everyone had voted. These die-hard voters are proud to have the first word on the big vote.

Clinton won more votes in Dixville and Hart's Location, but Trump was the overwhelming favorite in Millsfield, with a 16-4 edge.

Libertarian Gary Johnson picked up three votes. Bernie Sanders, John Kasich and 2012 Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney got write-in votes.

Under New Hampshire state law, communities with fewer than 100 voters can get permission to open their polls at midnight and close them as soon as all registered voters have cast their ballots.

11:50 p.m. Monday

Tim Kaine is thanking supporters, friends and family members during his final campaign rally before Election Day.

The Democratic vice presidential nominee says, "There's no place like home." He's at an airport homecoming late Monday in Richmond, Virginia, where Kaine has lived for 32 years.

He is with his wife, Anne Holton, and their daughter, Annella.

Kaine is praising running mate Hillary Clinton as someone who unites people and saying Donald Trump isn't qualified to be president.

The senator and former Virginia governor has not campaigned in his home state since shortly after he became the Democratic vice presidential nominee.

Clinton has maintained leads in most Virginia polls for several months, though the polls have shown the race tightening.

10 p.m.

Donald Trump just can't help himself.

The GOP nominee is reviving an insult derided as racist as he makes his final pitch to voters on the eve of Election Day.

Speaking during a rally in New Hampshire, Trump referred to Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren as "Pocahontas" — a reference to claims she made about being part Native American.

He's also calling Warren a "terrible person," ''a terrible human being" and a "terrible senator" who is hated by her colleagues.

The comment came as Trump continued to air grievances about the GOP primary and early concerns about whether he would be able to win more than 50 percent of the GOP vote.

9:53 p.m.

Donald Trump is bragging that he has the backing of two of New England's biggest sports stars.

The GOP nominee says at a Manchester, New Hampshire, rally that New England Patriots quarterback Tom Brady called him today to say he'd voted for him.

He also claims he received a "the most beautiful" letter from Bill Belichick, the Patriots head coach, congratulating him, wishing him luck Tuesday, and commending him for the way he'd handled "an unbelievable negative and slanted media."

"By the way, is there a better reference than Tom Brady and Bill Belichick?" he later asked the crowd. "I don't think so."

Brady told Boston's WEEI-FM Monday morning that he hadn't voted yet. Early voting in Massachusetts ended Friday.
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