The Latest: Bon Jovi tells Clinton crowd “World is watching”




WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on the U.S. presidential campaign (all times EDT):

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8:05 p.m.

Jon Bon Jovi is telling Hillary Clinton's supporters that "the world is watching" on the eve of Tuesday's presidential election.

The rock band front man performed at a rally near Philadelphia's Independence Hall ahead of appearances by Clinton, President Barack Obama and rocker Bruce Springsteen.

Bon Jovi says with the eyes of the world upon America, the nation needs to ask itself, "What kind of world do we want? I want a world of hope and optimism."

Bon Jovi has raised money for Clinton's campaign. His set list included "Who Says You Can't Go Home" and "Livin' on a Prayer."

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6:54 p.m.

Former vice president Al Gore says the future of the world is at stake in Tuesday's presidential election.

Gore spoke on Monday in Boulder, Colorado, to supporters of Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton. He declared: "This is a climate election."

Gore did not mention Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump. But he said Clinton would continue international efforts to reduce carbon emissions while Trump would walk away from them.

He told the crowd it could all come down to the election returns in Boulder, the liberal heart of this battleground state.

Gore became a high profile climate activist after losing the 2000 presidential election to Republican George W. Bush.

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6:37 p.m.

Hillary Clinton says she intends to call rival Donald Trump if she wins the presidency in Tuesday's election.

The Democratic presidential nominee says in a radio interview with Ryan Seacrest that she hopes Trump will "play a constructive role" in helping bring the country together.

Clinton says in an interview on the final day of campaigning that if she wins, she wants to bring together people who supported Trump for a "national conversation" after the election.

She says she wants to hear from people who supported Trump as well as people who supported her.

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Donald Trump says Hillary Clinton is "the face of failure" and he's predicting a "great victory" on Tuesday.as he holds his final Pennsylvania rally of the campaign.

Trump tells a roaring crowd in Scranton, Pennsylvania, that he doesn't believe polls that show him running neck-and-neck with rival Hillary Clinton.

Trump says, "I think we're going to blow 'em out tomorrow."

He adds, "This is not the sound of a second place finisher."

Trump is continuing to paint Clinton as a corrupt Washington insider who has accomplished too little in her years in public life.

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5:41 p.m.

President Barack Obama is reviving his own campaign call-and-response of "Fired up, ready to go" at a rally for Hillary Clinton.

Obama is getting nostalgic at his rally in Durham, New Hampshire, as he tells the story of how the chant came about in 2008. He says when he started running he was just a "skinny guy with a funny name."

Obama says a woman in a church hat in the back of a room at an obscure campaign event randomly started the chant, and it immediately caught on. He says it shows how one voice can change a room, and in turn change the world.

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5:19 p.m.

President Barack Obama says Donald Trump's conduct might be acceptable in other countries — but not in the United States.

Obama is railing against Trump during a rally in Durham, New Hampshire. It's Obama's second-to-last campaign event for Hillary Clinton.

Obama is mocking Trump for threatening to jail Hillary Clinton if he's elected. He says other countries discriminate against people based on their religion, but not the U.S.

Obama says, "Maybe Putin thinks it's ok. I don't think it's ok." He's referring to Vladimir Putin and Democrats' claim that Trump is too cozy with the Russian president.

The president says unlike Trump, Clinton "actually knows what's going on in the world."

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5:12 p.m.

Donald Trump continues to say that he's put $100 million of his own money into his presidential run. Fundraising records show that with just 24 hours to go, he's about $34 million short of that amount.

Trump's latest major contribution to his own campaign was $10 million on Oct. 28, according to Federal Election Commission reports. That brings his total investment to about $66 million.

He most recently made his $100 million assertion at a rally Monday afternoon in Raleigh, North Carolina.

Trump's personal investment shrinks when accounting for about $9 million in campaign cash that has returned to his family and businesses.

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5:10 p.m.

A soaring turnout from Latino voters has driven a record number of Americans to vote ahead of Election Day.

Associated Press data show at least 43.2 million people have cast ballots by early voting. Record levels have been reported in 23 states and the District of Columbia. Millions more ballots are still coming in.

The AP estimates that early votes could top 50 million. That comes to nearly 40 percent of all ballots. In 2012, there were 46 million early votes, or 35 percent.

The latest numbers show declines in voting from blacks in North Carolina — a drop-off after historic levels for Barack Obama in 2008 and 2012. But higher turnout by Latinos, who often lean Democratic, may be buoying Clinton in Florida. Both are must-win for Donald Trump.

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Hillary Clinton's campaign is serving a legal warning to television stations playing campaign ads that state the Democratic candidate is being investigated by the FBI.

Her campaign sent out cease-and-desist letters to multiple television stations on Monday. The letters ask the stations to stop playing ads from Donald Trump campaign and a super PAC supporting his bid making that claim. That's according to campaign aides.

FBI Director James Comey said on Sunday the agency would not reopen its investigation of her use of a private server as Secretary of State. The announcement came as a relief to her campaign, which has seen polls tighten amid speculation that the agency would reexamine the issue.

Clinton is campaigning in three battleground states on Monday, making her final swing of the 2016 race.

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4:57 p.m.

Donald Trump and Mike Pence are suggesting falsely that Hillary Clinton wants virtually no immigration controls.

Pence on the eve of Election Day again made the charge in Erie, Pennsylvania. The Republican vice presidential nominee noted a speech Clinton gave Brazil in 2013 as proof she'd have "open borders."

Republicans have seized on Clinton saying her "dream is a hemispheric common market, with open trade and open borders." But she was talking specifically about the energy market, not immigration.

Clinton does support a more lenient immigration policy than Trump's proposal for a wall on the U.S.-Mexico border. She would grant a path to citizenship to some people already in the U.S. illegally. She has not proposed open borders.

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4:47 p.m.

Hillary Clinton's final rally will be a star-studded affair in battleground North Carolina.

The campaign announced Monday that the midnight event in Raleigh will feature Lady Gaga, Jon Bon Jovi and DJ Samantha Ronson. Clinton's family will also attend.

The rally will conclude a whirlwind tour of battleground states in the final days before the election. Clinton is also visiting Michigan and Pennsylvania on Monday.

Clinton's celebrity guests in recent days have included Jay Z and Beyonce, James Taylor and Katy Perry.

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Hillary Clinton says she'll be a president for all Americans — including Republicans.

The Democrat is making the case that Donald Trump is unqualified as she is campaigns in Grand Rapids, Michigan. The area has a lot of GOP voters.

She says she's gotten to know a lot of presidents from her days interning and then working on Capitol Hill, to becoming first lady, a senator and President Barack Obama's secretary of state. She adds that regardless of party, "I never doubted they were fit to serve as our president."

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4:46 p.m.

Donald Trump continues to say that he's put $100 million of his own money into his presidential run. Fundraising records show that with just 24 hours to go, he's about $34 million short of that amount.

Trump's latest major contribution to his own campaign was $10 million on Oct. 28, according to Federal Election Commission reports. That brings his total investment to about $66 million.

He most recently made his $100 million assertion at a rally Monday afternoon in Raleigh, North Carolina.

Trump's personal investment shrinks when accounting for about $9 million in campaign cash that has returned to his family and businesses.

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4:16 p.m.

Donald Trump is hop-scotching the country, delivering his closing argument to voters with just hours left before Election Day polls open.

Trump made his second stop of the day in battleground North Carolina. He's painting a dismal picture of life in the country, describing an indebted, crime-ridden nation that only he can fix.

Trump tells a Raleigh audience, "You've got a half a day to make every dream you've ever dreamed for your country and for your family to come true."

Trump has been predicting victory, but says if he doesn't win, he'll consider it "the single greatest waste of time, energy and money."

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3:52 p.m.

Latinos aren't the only ones seeing big jumps in turnout in early voting.

Asian-American voters have increased across the board in key states being targeted by both presidential campaigns. That's according to an analysis by Catalist, a Democratic analytical firm.

The racial group in more recent presidential elections has tilted heavily Democratic.

Ballots from Asian-Americans have roughly doubled in Florida, Arizona, Virginia and North Carolina.

In Georgia, ballots from the group have almost tripled.

Smaller in population, Asian-Americans typically make up about 1 percent to 2 percent of a state's vote share. But they have become more pivotal in closely fought battleground states with larger numbers of their communities, such as Nevada and Virginia.

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3:44 p.m.

Tim Kaine is wrapping his last tour in a key swing state with an aggressive speech criticizing Republican Donald Trump.

The Democratic vice presidential nominee said Trump's "divisive, insult driven" campaign has shown he's not fit to be president.

"As you campaign, so you will govern," Kaine said.

Kaine reminded supporters that Trump had insulted numerous individuals, including a Muslim Gold Star family and Sen. John McCain.

Kaine made the remarks in Wilmington, North Carolina, his third stop in the battleground state Monday. He is scheduled to finish the day with two events in his home state of Virginia.

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