All posts by Lima News

Inconsistency in OVI license suspensions addressed

First Posted: 9:52 am - May 25th, 2016

Bob Cupp
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COLUMBUS —Legislation that addresses inconsistency in state law with regard to OVI license suspensions has cleared the House and is headed to the Senate.

Under current law, a Court may allow a second-time OVI (Operating a Vehicle Impaired) offender restricted driving privileges after 45 days of the imposition of a driver’s license suspension. However, a court may not release the offender’s vehicle from the immobilized order until the full 90 days have elapsed. This lack of conformity can result in individuals being able to drive lawfully, but without a vehicle to do it in.

House bill 436 making the time periods for suspension and immobilization work together. It was jointly sponsored by Rep. Bob Cupp, R-Lima, and Rep. John Rogers, D-Mentor-on-the-Lake. “It gives the judges handling the case needed discretion tailored to the particular circumstances,” said Cupp.

Bob Cupp
http://limaohio.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_Bob_Cupp.jpgBob Cupp

The biggest CEO pay raises and pay cuts of 2015

First Posted: 8:35 am - May 25th, 2016

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Here are the three CEOs who got the biggest pay raises last year, and the deepest pay cuts, as calculated by The Associated Press and Equilar, an executive data firm.

Top raises:

1. Dara Khosrowshahi, Expedia, $94.6 million, up 881 percent. Stock return last fiscal year: 47 percent.

2. Sandeep Mathrani, General Growth Properties, $39.2 million, up 702 percent. Stock return: -1 percent.

3. Richard Handler, Leucadia, $7.4 million, up 404 percent. Stock return: -21 percent. Handler voluntarily gave up a $2.4 million bonus for 2014.

Deepest cuts:

1. Richard Hayne, Urban Outfitters, $44,310, down 92 percent. Stock return: -34 percent.

2. David Zaslav, Discovery Communications, $32.4 million, down 79 percent. Stock return: -23 percent.

3. Hock Tan, Broadcom, $4 million, down 77 percent. Stock return: 45 percent.

Man accused of Metro assault was indecent exposure suspect

First Posted: 8:35 am - May 25th, 2016

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WASHINGTON (AP) — Records show a man charged with trying to rape a woman last month on a Metro train outside the nation’s capital had been identified as a suspect in an indecent-exposure incident that occurred earlier in April.

The Washington Post reports (http://wapo.st/1OVtQlV) Metro spokeswoman Sherri Ly says police were in the process of obtaining an arrest warrant for 39-year-old John Prentice Hicks for indecent exposure when the alleged sexual assault happened April 12.

Documents show Metro police used video recordings and a witness account to identify Hicks as the suspect who exposed himself April 2 on a train.

Hicks, of Washington, D.C., was arrested April 12 after a woman said she was attacked by a man with a knife. He faces charges including first-degree rape and was ordered held without bond Monday.

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Information from: The Washington Post, http://www.washingtonpost.com

Trump, Clinton win Washington state’s presidential primaries

First Posted: 8:35 am - May 25th, 2016

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WASHINGTON (AP) — Democratic front-runner Hillary Clinton and presumptive Republican nominee Donald Trump each won primaries in Washington state.

Trump’s win Tuesday moves him to within 28 delegates of the clinching the Republican nomination for president.

Clinton’s win might give her some momentum, but it won’t get her any delegates. There were no delegates at stake in the Democratic primary. Washington Democrats already awarded their delegates based on party caucuses.

Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders won Washington’s caucuses in March, getting 74 delegates. Clinton got 27.

Republicans in Washington will allocate all 44 delegates to their national convention based on the primary results.

Trump won at least 40 delegates on Tuesday, with four still left to be allocated. The billionaire businessman has 1,209 delegates. It takes 1,237 delegates to win the GOP nomination.

There are no more Republican contests until June 7, when the last five states vote. With a total of 303 delegates at stake in California, Montana, New Jersey, New Mexico and South Dakota, Trump should easily clinch the nomination that day.

Trump is the only remaining candidate in the GOP contest. But his former opponents, Ohio Gov. John Kasich and Texas Sen. Ted Cruz, were still on the ballot because they suspended their campaigns after the ballots were printed. Ben Carson was also on the ballot because he never submitted the paperwork to have his name removed.

None of the former candidates got enough votes to qualify for delegates. The only question for the remaining four delegates in Washington is whether they will go to Trump or be uncommitted, under state party rules.

Sanders trails Hillary Clinton in the delegate count and he is running out of contests in his longshot bid to catch up.

Clinton is just 78 delegates short of clinching the Democratic nomination for president. She is on track to do so in early June, even if she loses all the remaining contests.

Clinton has 1,768 pledged delegates won in primaries and caucuses. Sanders has 1,497.

Clinton’s lead is even bigger when superdelegate endorsements are included. These are the party leaders and elected officials who can support the candidate of their choice.

Overall, Clinton has 2,305 delegates and Sanders has 1,539. It takes 2,383 delegates to win the Democratic nomination.

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Follow Stephen Ohlemacher on Twitter at http://twitter.com/stephenatap

French security chief: Strikes won’t threaten sports events

First Posted: 8:35 am - May 25th, 2016

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PARIS (AP) — France’s interior minister says violent labor protests and strikes causing gas shortages won’t jeopardize the upcoming European Championship or other sporting events.

About 1,500 people have been detained in recent weeks and hundreds of police officers have been injured in breaking up protests and dislodging protesters from fuel depots.

The tensions have added to concern about security for Euro 2016, already facing what Interior Minister Bernard Cazeneuve called the “double threat” of violent Islamic extremism and hooliganism.

Cazeneuve told reporters Wednesday that the government respects the right to strike and does not see the labor movement as a “threat.”

He said it won’t disrupt protection of the June 10-July 10 championship, involving an unprecedented 90,000 people ensuring security.

London’s Donmar staging all-female Shakespeare trilogy

First Posted: 8:35 am - May 25th, 2016

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LONDON (AP) — London’s small but powerful Donmar Warehouse is branching out — across town and across the Atlantic.

The theater is mounting an all-female Shakespeare trilogy in a temporary 420-seat venue beside King’s Cross railway station.

Harriet Walter will play Brutus in “Julius Caesar,” the king in “Henry IV” and Prospero in “The Tempest” under the direction of Phyllida Lloyd. The plays — set inside a women’s prison — will run from Sept. 23 to Dec. 16, with a quarter of tickets free to under-25s.

Three Donmar shows are also New York-bound. Online surveillance drama “Privacy,” starring Daniel Radcliffe, opens at the Public Theater in July, “Les Liaisons Dangereuses” with Janet McTeer and Liev Schreiber is the Booth Theater from October, and “The Tempest” transfers to Brooklyn’s St. Ann’s Warehouse in January.

PP-GOP-Delg-All,100

First Posted: 8:35 am - May 25th, 2016

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Image of Asia: Feeding West Indian manatees

First Posted: 8:35 am - May 25th, 2016

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In this photo by Wong Maye-E, aquarists feed West Indian manatees at the River Safari wildlife park in Singapore. The river-themed park recently opened and has chosen the manatee as its animal icon. It has 14 West Indian manatees, a species that is considered vulnerable. Through captive breeding of manatees, the River Safari hopes to contribute to the species’ population. To date, more than 10 manatees have been born in Singapore.

PP-Dem-Pres-All,100

First Posted: 8:35 am - May 25th, 2016

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PP-GOP-Pres-All,100

First Posted: 8:35 am - May 25th, 2016

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Burundi: 2 killed in violence linked to president’s new term

First Posted: 8:35 am - May 25th, 2016

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BUJUMBURA, Burundi (AP) — A Burundi official says gunmen killed two people including a local police chief in the central province of Mwaro, in continuing violence associated with President Pierre Nkurunziza’s extended time in power.

Aloys Ndenzaki, chief of Ndava community in Mwaro, said Wednesday around 10 men riding motorcycles — two armed with guns — killed the chief of judicial police who was at a beer warehouse. Ndenzaki says the owner of the warehouse was wounded. The group then killed a guard at the ruling party’s offices before trying to torch the building.

Nkurunziza’s third term in office has been opposed by many who say it’s unconstitutional. The April 2015 announcement of Nkurunziza’s candidacy sparked violent streets protests, which boiled over into an attempted coup and rebellion. Nkurunziza won the polls in July.

Dad of missing teen fishermen recalls ‘gut-wrenching’ search

First Posted: 8:35 am - May 25th, 2016

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WEST PALM BEACH, Fla. (AP) — The father of one of two missing teenage fishermen detailed the “gut-wrenching” search for the boys during an interview with investigators from the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission.

Austin Stephanos and Perry Cohen, both 14, disappeared during a storm off Jupiter, Florida, July 24. Their capsized 19-foot boat was found in the Bahamas by a Norwegian cargo ship and returned to South Florida May 16.

The Palm Beach Post (http://bit.ly/22oQjKh ) reports that Blu Stephanos told investigators in September that his son Austin was allowed to go “a couple of miles offshore on a calm day.” In the taped interview released by the agency, Stephanos recalled searching for the boys until dark.

Stephanos told investigators that Austin texted him at 11:24 a.m. that day, saying he was fishing.

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Information from: The Palm Beach (Fla.) Post, http://www.pbpost.com

Wind, snow hamper searching, retrieval of bodies on Everest

First Posted: 8:35 am - May 25th, 2016

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KATHMANDU, Nepal (AP) — Bad weather on Mount Everest on Wednesday prevented retrieval of two bodies of climbers who died on mountain and the search for two who disappeared near the summit, expedition organizers said.

Most climbers have finished their attempts to reach the summit, but those still trying were having problems with the low visibility, wind and snow.

Pemba Sherpa of the Seven Summit Treks agency in Kathmandu said a helicopter waited all day at base camp for weather to clear so it could fly to a higher camp.

A Dutch climber’s body was brought to Camp 2 at 6,400 meters (21,000 feet), while an Australian climber’s body is at Camp 3 located at 7,200 meters (23,620 feet).

The Sherpas who are attempting to carry the bodies were struggling because of the weather condition on the slopes of Everest.

Wangchu Sherpa of the Trekking Camp Nepal agency in Kathmandu said his team was searching for two Indian climbers missing near the summit since the weekend and rescuers were also attempting to reach the body of a third Indian died to bring it back to lower camp.

Nearly 400 climbers have scaled the 8,850-meter (29,035-foot) peak since May 11. However, three climbers have died and two are missing on the unpredictable slopes of the world’s highest mountain.

The spring climbing season generally ends in May after which the monsoon season brings bad weather that makes climbing the mountain impossible.

German far-right angry at soccer team’s photos on candy bars

First Posted: 8:35 am - May 25th, 2016

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BERLIN (AP) — Photos of Germany’s national soccer team on packages of a popular chocolate brand have prompted online outrage among Germany’s far right because they include childhood pictures of players of migrant origin.

Candymaker Ferrero swapped the usual blond boy on its ‘Kinder’ bars ahead of this summer’s European Championships for photos of German players as children. Among them are Jerome Boateng, whose father is from Ghana, and Ilkay Gundogan, whose parents are Turkish.

A regional branch of the anti-Islam PEGIDA movement asked on Facebook “Is this a joke?” Other commenters expressed outrage Wednesday and threatened boycotts.

Tommy Frenck, the owner of a restaurant catering to the far right, said on Facebook the pictures “make it very easy give up chocolate” and urged a boycott “until marketing bosses have come to their senses.”

AP Delegate Count,100

First Posted: 8:35 am - May 25th, 2016

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Case reopened for ‘Real Housewives’ star Teresa Giudice

First Posted: 8:35 am - May 25th, 2016

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NEWARK, N.J. (AP) — A federal judge has reopened a bankruptcy case for “Real Housewives of New Jersey” cast member Teresa Giudice (JOO’-dys), who pleaded guilty in 2014 to bankruptcy fraud.

Giudice finished her 15-month sentence in December after she and her husband, Joe, admitted they hid assets from bankruptcy creditors and submitted phony loan applications to get $5 million in mortgages and construction loans.

NJ.com reports (http://bit.ly/1XUpcXk ) Teresa Giudice’s attorneys on Tuesday told a federal bankruptcy court judge she has agreements to pay off all but two of her 29 creditors. Giudice had been trying to block the reopening of the case.

The newspaper says Judge Stacey Meisel’s decision to reopen the case could mean unsatisfied creditors might be able to collect potential proceeds from a lawsuit she filed against her bankruptcy attorney.

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Information from: NJ Advance Media.

The Latest: 40 percent of Paris gas stations see shortages

First Posted: 8:35 am - May 25th, 2016

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PARIS (AP) — The Latest on France’s strikes and protests against the government’s labor reforms (all times local):

2:10 p.m.

France’s junior minister for transportation says France has used three out of 115 days of fuel reserves to deal with gasoline shortages caused by strikes and protests over a proposed labor reform bill.

Alain Vidalies says about 40 percent of the gas stations in the Paris region have been hit by partial or total fuel shortages. He says 11 fuel depots have been unblocked by the police since the protests against the government’s labor policies started last week.

Vidalies insists that no decision about requisitioning any refinery has been made by the government because the main issue is to ensure access to the fuel depots.

The government labor bill extends the work week and makes layoffs easier.

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12:05 p.m.

French drivers are hunting for gasoline or waiting in long lines to get it — and grumbling about strikes that are causing fuel shortages.

Fouad Rharib, in line Wednesday at a crowded gas station on the western edge of Paris, says “our two cars are on the minimum level of petrol and we need to drive our children to school and to go at work. … it is unacceptable.”

Another customer, Olivier Criq, expressed support for the labor protests but not the fuel strikes. He says “I agree with the right to strike, but I don’t agree with the blockade. They can go to block government ministries and the (president’s) Elysee palace. It is not normal that the French people are being held hostage like this.”

Unions are leading strikes at fuel depots and refineries as part of a nationwide labor movement against a government labor reform bill that extends the work week and makes layoffs easier.

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11:15 a.m.

France has started using its fuel reserves to deal with gasoline shortages caused by strikes and protests over a bill weakening worker protections.

Unions are targeting the nation’s gas tanks, railroads and electricity network this week as they try to push the government to drop the labor reform, devised to make France more globally competitive by extending the work week and making layoffs easier. Opponents say it will enrich company bosses and won’t create the jobs it promises.

The head of the group overseeing France’s petroleum industry, UFIP, said Wednesday on RMC radio the government has approved the use of fuel stocks for the past two days.

Francis Duseux said there are about three months of reserves that could be used if needed. He acknowledged “the situation is tense” but attributed it to panic buying. “Demand is so high that we aren’t managing to keep up,” he said.

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9:30 a.m.

Unions have blocked depots and refineries around France to try to bring road traffic to a halt. Workers at a major oil terminal in the port of Le Havre plan a strike Thursday to block imports.

Riot police forced striking workers out of a fuel depot early Wednesday in Douchy-les-Mines in northern France that had been blocked for several days, Sud union member Willy Dans tells BFM television.

Meanwhile, train drivers also are staging a one-day strike Wednesday. The SNCF national rail authority said 25 percent of high-speed TGV trains have been were cancelled, and a similar number of regional and commuter trains are affected.

And workers at the country’s nuclear plants — source of the majority of France’s electricity — plan a one-day strike Thursday. State-run Electricite de France would not comment on the eventual consequences for electricity supplies around the country.

Protests for $15 wage expected at McDonald’s headquarters

First Posted: 8:35 am - May 25th, 2016

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OAK BROOK, Ill. (AP) — Protesters demanding a higher minimum wage are expected to march on the McDonald’s Corp. headquarters near Chicago ahead of the fast-food giant’s annual shareholders’ meeting.

Organizers say the protests will begin Wednesday morning with a strike at the Rock N Roll McDonald’s in downtown Chicago. Striking cooks and cashiers will later join a march on the McDonald’s headquarters in Oak Brook.

Demonstrations are also expected Thursday during the shareholders’ meeting.

Home care, child care and other low-wage workers are expected to join the fast-food workers for the demonstrations. The nationwide push for a $15 minimum wage began in 2012.

In the first quarter, McDonald’s reported $1.1 billion in profits on sales of $5.9 billion.

Egypt hires 2 foreign firms in search for plane recorders

First Posted: 8:35 am - May 25th, 2016

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CAIRO (AP) — The chief of EgyptAir says Egypt has contracted two foreign companies to help locate the flight data recorders of the carrier’s plane that crashed last week in the Mediterranean, killing all 66 passengers and crew on board.

Safwat Masalam said on Wednesday that a French and an Italian company will be working with Egyptian search teams to try and find the black boxes, which could give clues as to what happened in the final minutes of the flight. He didn’t identify the companies.

Earlier, President Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi said a submarine would join the search.

Ships and planes from Britain, Cyprus, France, Greece and the U.S. are also participating in the search for the debris from the aircraft, including the black boxes. Some wreckage, including human remains, has already been recovered.

4 Central European countries ready to send troops to Baltics

First Posted: 8:35 am - May 25th, 2016

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LIBLICE, Czech Republic (AP) — Four Central European countries say they are working on a plan to deploy their troops in the Baltics states as part of NATO forces.

In a declaration signed Wednesday, the Czech Republic, Hungary, Slovakia and Poland say that their defense leaders will work out details of the plan to be presented at a NATO summit in Warsaw in July.

The troops from each of the four states should be available for a rotational deployment starting on Jan. 1. Their activities will focus on training and exercises.

The four countries form an informal grouping known as the Visegrad Group. They say they support an increased NATO presence in member states Poland and the Baltics, which feel threatened by Russia.

Detroit-area cop delivers pizza after takeout driver hurt

First Posted: 8:35 am - May 25th, 2016

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ALLEN PARK, Mich. (AP) — A suburban Detroit police officer stepped in after a pizza delivery driver was injured in a car crash to make sure a still-warm order made it to its destination.

Lincoln Park police Cpl. Joe Sparks tells The Detroit News that Monday’s collision sent the Jet’s Pizza driver to a hospital with bruises and a sore head. Sparks spotted an oven bag in the wrecked car before it was towed and realized the delivery address was nearby.

The 16-year veteran of the force says he “just figured it was the right thing to do” knowing that “someone on the other end was waiting for their food.”

Carl Babik, who got the pizza, tells WDIV-TV he initially thought that he had done something wrong when Sparks showed up with the order.

Babies behind bars: Moms do time with their newborns

First Posted: 8:35 am - May 25th, 2016

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BEDFORD HILLS, N.Y. (AP) — Jennifer Dumas sits on a sofa, her smiling 6-month-old girl on her lap. The room is full of bright toys and children’s books. A rainbow-colored activity mat is on the floor, and Winnie the Pooh is painted on the walls.

It looks like any other nursery, except that there are bars on the windows and barbed-wire fences outside the austere brick building.

New York’s maximum-security Bedford Hills Correctional Facility is one of the very few prisons in the U.S. that allow inmates and their babies to live together, a century-old approach that not all corrections experts agree is the best way to deal with women who are locked up while pregnant.

Mothers who get such a chance say it’s better than the alternative: In most prisons, babies born behind bars must be given up within a day to a relative or foster care.

“Before I came here, I thought it was a terrible idea. A baby in prison? No, thank you,” the 24-year-old Dumas said as her daughter, Codylynn, gleefully rocked in a bouncy seat. “But it’s actually wonderful to be able to spend this much time with my little girl. … I’m blessed to be able to go through this.”

Nobody thinks raising babies behind bars is ideal, and some worry that the children could be scarred by the experience. But some advocates say that the practice allows mother and child to develop a vital psychological attachment, and that the parenting classes and other practical instruction help the moms stay out of trouble when they get out.

About 112,000 women are in state and federal prisons, mostly for drug or property crimes. And an estimated 1 in 25 are pregnant when they enter, according to the nonprofit Sentencing Project. But there are no national statistics on the number of babies born to inmates.

Of the more than 100 women’s prisons in the U.S., there are only eight nurseries. While nearly 100 countries, including South Sudan and France, have national laws that allow for incarcerated mothers to stay with their babies, the U.S. is not among them.

Dumas was three weeks pregnant when she was arrested last year, along with her boyfriend, on charges they tried to steal a safe packed with $32,000 in cash and jewelry. Her baby was born just days after she took a plea bargain on attempted burglary charges that sent her to Bedford Hills for up to two years.

She is now among 15 carefully screened new mothers allowed to serve up to 18 months of their sentences in a nursery unit that includes a communal playroom stocked with toys and mother-and-child rooms equipped with a single bed and a crib. The walls are painted with rainbows, fluffy clouds and jungle and barnyard scenes. The nursery currently has 16 babies, including a set of twins.

During workday hours, the babies are taken across the street to a day care center, where they are watched by staff and other inmates while the moms go to school or vocational programs.

But there are constant reminders it is a prison. Armed officers patrol the unit. And the moms know their babies can be taken away for such infractions as fighting or even leaving a toy in a crib while the baby sleeps.

“It’s still scary,” Dumas said. “At any given point if you do what you’re not supposed to your baby could get sent home.”

Some women have been dropped from the program from time to time for breaking the rules, but corrections officials and advocates said they could not recall any instances in recent years in which a baby was harmed.

Still, some argue that prison should be reserved for punishment and that women should instead consider putting their children up for adoption.

“The focus should be on what’s best for the baby,” said James Dwyer, a law professor at the College of William & Mary who has written a paper on the topic. “There is skepticism about these women being adequate parents.”

Columbia University researcher Mary Byrne, who spent years studying mothers and children who started life in Bedford Hills, said that the youngsters formed critical attachments to their mothers and that a second study after they were released found they were no different from children raised entirely on the outside.

“Many people would assume any exposure to prison would cause problems … they’ll be exposed to violence and horrible people, it will scar them,” she said. “But that’s not what we found.”

Sister Teresa Fitzgerald, the Roman Catholic nun who runs Hour Children, the nonprofit organization that operates Bedford Hills’ nursery, put it more bluntly: “Babies belong with their mother. In a palace or a prison, they don’t know and don’t care as long as they feel loved and supported.”

The nursery is operated under an annual contract with the state of about $170,000, the correction department said. It would cost $480,000 a year to put 16 babies in foster care, according to state figures.

Bedford Hills’ recidivism rate for women in the nursery program is fairly typical of such programs, at 13 percent versus 26 percent for all female inmates at the prison, according to a report by the Women’s Prison Association, an advocacy group.

Bedford Hills, situated on a wooded hill an hour north of New York City, houses the oldest continuously operating prison nursery in the country, opened in 1901.

There were many nurseries years ago, according to Elaine Lord, the former superintendent. But they fell out of favor amid a huge influx of prisoners in the 1980s and a shift in thinking that said the privilege of living with your baby was inconsistent with the concept of punishment.

Most of the nation’s prison nurseries have cropped up in the past 20 years.

The nursery at the Indiana Women’s Prison houses up to 10 mother-infant pairs for up to 18 months. In South Dakota, a child can stay only 30 days. In Washington state, it’s three years. The Decatur Correctional Center in Illinois opened a nursery in 2007, and 73 moms and 69 babies have participated.

In Decatur, Kalee Ford, who is about 26 weeks’ pregnant and in prison on a drug-related conviction, already has been accepted into the program and is taking prenatal courses. She said she wasn’t the mother she could have been to her two other children because of methamphetamine. The program is giving her hope that she can clean up for good.

“I believe that everybody deserves at least one chance to fix mistakes that they’ve made,” she said. “My children didn’t do this, and they deserve to have me back.”

At Decatur, Bedford Hills and other programs, mothers-to-be are selected based on their crimes and whether there is any history of child abuse.

Many advocates question why such women need to be incarcerated at all. Typically, women accepted into these programs are nonviolent offenders serving fairly short sentences — ideal candidates for less-expensive, halfway house-like programs that allow mother and child to stay together.

After their sentences are up, almost all of the mothers at Bedford go to a live-in halfway house in New York City run by Fitzgerald’s organization that also helps with day care and jobs. Mothers say it’s a golden ticket.

Dumas, who has a son on the outside, hopes to go there, too.

“It’s a way to get on my feet, try being a parent again on the outside but with a safety net,” she said. “I don’t know anyone who gets that.”

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Associated Press video journalist Teresa Crawford contributed to this report from Decatur, Ill.